Travel by Amtrak

Packages: Pacific Northwest

Seattle

This brilliant jewel of the Pacific Northwest, from the unusual Pike Place Market and landmark Space Needle to the shimmering waters of the Puget Sound, has something for everyone.

The downtown location of all of our hotels, as well as a comprehensive Seattle city tour, which includes the Water Front, Pioneer Square and Ballard's Loch, will acquaint you with the “Emerald City."

Seattle is a coastal seaport city and the seat of King County, in the U.S. state of Washington. With an estimated 652,405 residents as of 2013, Seattle is the largest city in both the State of Washington and the Pacific Northwest region of North America and, as of July 2013, the fastest-growing major city in the United States. The city is situated on a narrow isthmus between Puget Sound (an inlet of the Pacific Ocean) and Lake Washington, about 100 miles (160 km) south of the Canada–United States border.

Victoria BC

The capital city of British Columbia, Victoria boasts many historic buildings and some of the best museums in Western Canada. The area is also home to some of the country's most exhilarating scenery: there's an ocean or mountain (or both!) vista around every corner, and the city's flower gardens are famous the world over.

Established in 1843 as a fort for the Hudson's Bay Company, Victoria's British ancestry is apparent in the double-decker buses, horse-drawn carriages, formal gardens and tearooms. The city is now a cosmopolitan center with a lively entertainment scene and a wonderful array of attractions.

Vancouver BC

Vancouver offers travelers both outstanding opportunities for outdoor adventure and the sophisticated amenities of a world-class city. Take advantage of the city's ocean side location, with plenty of green space and flower gardens. After a busy day of sightseeing, linger over a glass of BC wine and a locally inspired meal, or unwind at one of Vancouver's unique spas.

Vancouver has, for thousands of years, been a place of meeting, trade and settlement. The presence of people in the Vancouver area dates from 8,000 to 10,000 years ago when the glaciers of the last ice age began to disappear. The first Europeans to explore the area were Spanish Captain José María Narváez in 1791, and British naval Captain George Vancouver in 1792. The area was not settled by Europeans until almost a century later, in 1862. The city grew rapidly following completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) transcontinental line from Eastern Canada, allowing for continuous rail service in the late 1880s.